Mayur Deshpande
  Personal trainer in Mumbai
Nutritional Supplements Library Apple cider vinegar

Nutritional Supplements Library

Apple cider vinegar


What is Apple cider vinegar?

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Apple cider vinegar is a type of vinegar made by the fermentation of apple cider. During this process, sugar in the apple cider is broken down by bacteria and yeast into alcohol and then into vinegar. Apple cider vinegar contains acetic acid (like other types of vinegar) and some lactic, citric and malic acids. Unlike white vinegar, apple cider vinegar is a light yellow-brown color and is often sold unfiltered and unpasteurized with a dark, cloudy sediment called mother of vinegar (consisting mainly of acetic acid bacteria) settled at the bottom of the bottle. Apple cider vinegar has long been used in traditional medicine systems for a variety of uses. It is created when apples are crushed and allowed to ferment in wooden barrels. This fermenting process allows for the formation of acetic acid, and this acid is responsible for apple cider vinegars bitter taste.


What are the effective dosages of Apple cider vinegar?

No specific doses are supported by well-designed clinical trials. In general, 2 teaspoons of cider vinegar have been taken in 1 cup water three times daily. Also, 285-milligram tablets have been taken with meals. Topical and rectal preparations have also been used but safety is unclear.


What are the benefits of Apple cider vinegar supplementation?

Weight Loss -For thousands of years, vinegar has been used for weight loss. White vinegar (and perhaps other types) might help people feel full. A 2005 study of 12 people found that those who ate a piece of bread along with small amounts of white vinegar felt fuller and more satisfied than those who just ate the bread.
Leg cramps - Try a regular tonic of ACV 2 or 3 teaspoons to eight-ounces of water along with 1-2 teaspoon of honey. The ACV helps your body's absorption of calcium and magnesium this will help protect against painful leg cramps.
Blood pressure and heart health - Another study in rats found that vinegar could lower high blood pressure. A large epidemiological study also found that people who ate oil and vinegar dressing on salads five to six times a week had lower rates of heart disease than people who didn't. However, it's far from clear that the vinegar was the reason.
Cancer - A few laboratory studies have found that vinegar may be able to kill cancer cells or slow their growth. Epidemiological studies of people have been confusing. One found that eating vinegar was associated with a decreased risk of esophageal cancer. Another associated it with an increased risk of bladder cancer.
Diabetes -The effect of vinegar on blood glucose levels is perhaps the best-researched and the most promising of apple cider vinegar's possible health benefits. Several studies have found that vinegar may help lower glucose levels. For instance, one 2007 study of 11 people with type 2 diabetes found that taking two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bed lowered glucose levels in the morning by 4%-6%.
Dandruff - A home remedy for dandruff is to mix 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar with 1/4 cup water. The vinegar solution is thought to restore the restore the pH balance of the scalp and discourage the overgrowth of malassezia furfur, the yeast-like fungus thought to trigger dandruff.
High Cholesterol -A 2006 study found that rats fed acetic acid (the main ingredient in vinegar) had significantly lower total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Large, human trials are needed to see if the same results occur in humans.
Acid Reflux - Apple cider vinegar in water is a popular home remedy for acid reflux. It's based on a theory by some alternative medicine practitioners that heartburn and reflux are actually symptoms of insufficient stomach acid caused by aging, poor diet or overusing antacids or other medications. Alternative practitioners usually rely on laboratories that conduct alternative tests to assess stomach acidity prior to any treatment.
Acne - Apple cider vinegar is a home remedy for acne. A typical application is one part apple cider vinegar to three parts water and the solution is dabbed onto the pimple. Although some people swear by it, caution should be used because there have been case reports of skin damage and burns from using full-strength vinegar on the face.
High cholesterol - A 2006 study showed evidence that vinegar could lower cholesterol. However, the study was done in rats, so it's too early to know how it might work in people.
Food Poisoning - There have been many cases where people who were taking ACV regularly did not suffer from food poisoning. ACV has an antiseptic quality that seems to combat food poisoning.


What are the side effects of Apple cider vinegar supplementation?

Apple cider vinegar is highly acidic. The main ingredient of apple cider vinegar is acetic acid. As the name suggests, it's quite harsh. Apple cider vinegar should always be diluted with water or juice before swallowed. Pure apple cider vinegar could damage the tooth enamel and the tissues in your throat and mouth. One study found a woman who got an apple cider vinegar supplement stuck in her throat. She seemed to have suffered lasting damage to her esophagus. Theoretically, prolonged use of apple cider vinegar could lead to lower potassium levels, which could increase the risk of toxicity of cardiac glycoside drugs such as Lanoxin (digoxin), insulin, laxatives and diuretics such as Lasix (furosemide).